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Schuberth is one of the top quality helmet manufacturers at this moment. Their helmets are high quality, innovative and you can find them not only in the motorcycle world, but also in car racing (just look at the Formula One races) and even in the fire fighter communities around the world.

They are also very expensive and in case you were wondering, yes, they are German. And like with most German things, they are well built, and made to last.

Schuberth has different motorcycle helmet lines, all beginning with a letter indicating the type of helmet (S for sports, SR for racing, C for flip-up/modular, J for jet/open face, etc). Schuberth are also known for their female helmet models. For example, their latest flip-up helmet, the C3Pro also exists in a C3Pro Women version.

Schuberth M1

Schuberth M1

At the German motorcycle exhibition Intermot, Schuberth showed their latest model range, the M range. M stands for Metropolitan, therefore it’s a jet/open face type helmet.

As we know by now, jet helmets are more prone to being dangerous (compared to integral/full face helmets). But Schuberth would not be Schuberth if they did not try to minimize any dangers. Therefore the M1 helmet is designed in such a way that it’s safer than a conventional jet helmet. You can see from the photo above that the cheek area offers better protection than conventional jet helmets. More of the face is covered, but the mouth & nose part remains uncovered.

Schuberth-M1-2

The M1 comes in seven different colors, and the quick release visor comes in five different colors. The built-in sun visor, also available in five different colors, can be used without the normal visor, hence the quick release mechanism for the main visor.

Schuberth-M1-3

The helmet is equipped with a very good ventilation system, with a rear extractor vent that can be closed. But the M1 is also pre-equipped for the integrated wireless communications package from Schuberth called the SRC-System. In fact, the wireless communication device comes from the American Cardo systems. The inside of the helmet has a built-in antenna that will greatly enhance communication quality and range.

In the following photo you can clearly see the SRC installed in the back of the helmet.

Schuberth-M1-4

As jet helmets go, the Schuberth is beautiful, and safer than most. Top notch, but expensive. No prices have been released so far, but expect it to be in the $300 to $400 range.

Schuberth M1 with sun visor only

Schuberth M1 with sun visor only

Electric motorcycles and scooters, as the type name implies, run on electricity. Obviously, the two wheelers don’t have a very long extension lead plugged into a socket, but instead they run on batteries.

But normal 12V motorcycle batteries as we know them will not supply enough power to propel the bike any further than a mile or two. No, to be able to ride a reasonable distance on an electrically powered two wheeler, you need more batteries, and these batteries need to have a higher energy.

Take for example one of the top American electric motorcycle manufacturers, Brammo. This is what a Brammo will look like if you cut it open:

Brammo-Batteries-1

Those blue things are the batteries. They are Lithium-Ion batteries, and they are not 12V but 103 Volt (with a max voltage of 117.6V). They supply a total capacity of 9.31 kWh, with a peak of 10.2 kWh.

Brammo-Batteries-2

It’s the battery pack capacity that counts for electric motorcycles. The higher the number, the more power it has.

But to recharge so many batteries requires special equipment. Depending on where you plug your bike in (known as Level 1, 2 or even 3 charging) you can fully charge your bike in 3.5 hours or 8 hours (in the case of level 1, your household electrical socket).

But all those batteries make the bike heavy. If you look closely at the photos, you’ll see that the engine is the smallest part, in sharp contrast with its ICE (Internal Combustion Engine) cousins. The biggest volume is taken up by the batteries. In total, the Brammo Empulse weighs 460 lbs (some 213 kilos).

But despite the heavy weight, the Brammo can still deliver an incredible 90 Nm of peak torque, more than most sportsmotorcycles.

Even electric scooters use similar large amounts of batteries. Take for example the BMW C-Evolution:

BMW-C-Evolution-Batteries

Apart from the 12 cells (which by the way come from the electric car from BMW, the i3), there is one “normal” 12V battery located in the front housing which takes care of the normal electrical functions (dashboard, horn, etc).

The engine’s batteries, like the Brammo, are Lithium-Ion and supply 8 kWh. Recharging these batteries using a standard domestic 12A socket takes 4 hours (if it’s a 16A socket, it’ll take 3 hours).

The 12 cells supply 60 Ah and 133V, and the whole scooter weighs 265 kilos. But despite that weight, you get a torque of 72 Nm which is available all the time.

So as you can see, batteries take up the biggest amount of space on an electric bike. By far! Over the next few years, even decade, the batteries will start becoming smaller, lighter and packing more punch, allowing for longer rides. But until then, you will need to content yourself with riding 60 to 100 miles before requiring a charge. Far enough for a daily commute, not far enough for a weekend ride of the Tail of the Dragon at Deals Gap.

At the Intermot international motorcycle exhibition in Germany, Scorpion came out with full guns blazing with at least 6 new helmets. Here are their new helmets.

Exo-2000 Evo Air

Scorpion-EXO-2000-EVO-Air

Scorpion-EXO-2000-EVO-Air

Although not a brand new model, the Exo-2000 Air is now called Exo-2000 Evo Air (so it’s an evolution) and it is even lighter. To be exact, it now weighs 1280 grams. This helmet is best on the track, which it was designed for.

The helmet is equipped with the internal air-expansion system using an air-pump (AirFit HelmetPump), visors with the Pinlock system, Titanium Double-D closing system and quick release in case of an accident.

Exo-1200 Air

Scorpion-EXO-1200-Air

Scorpion-EXO-1200-Air

The new Exo-1200 Air replaces the Exo-1000 Air and has a visor mounting system (Ellip-Tec) that is easier and with a higher performance. The new shape reduces aerodynamic turbulence.

The helmet is intended for both track and street use.

Exo-710 Air

Scorpion-Exo-710-Air

Scorpion-Exo-710-Air

The Exo-710 Air replaces the 5 year old Exo-710 Air. The model is meant for bikers looking for high quality full face helmets without all the bells and whistles. So no sun visor, but with multiple ventilations slots and the AirFit helmet pump.

The helmet will weigh on average (depending on size) 1450 grams.

Exo-3000 Air

Scorpion-EXO-3000-Air

Scorpion-EXO-3000-Air

The Exo-3000 Air was a surprise for everyone since Scorpion had only recently released the modular flip-up helmet Exo-910 Air. But the Exo-3000 Air is lighter and much more silent.

The upmarket version of their flip-up helmet is equipped with their air-expansion system, and removable sun visor.

Exo-220

Scorpion-EXO-220

Scorpion-EXO-220

The Exo-200 is a open face/jet helmet that is well vented. It has two air inlets and two air extractors. The new helmet replaces the Exo-210.

The visor itself is long and wide, allowing for better visibility in traffic.

VX-15 Air Evo

Scorpion-VX-15-EVO-Air

Scorpion-VX-15-EVO-Air

As the name implies, this model is an evolution of the VX-15 Air. More graphics, a more aggressive chin and visor and the insides that can be adjusted using the HelmetPump.

Not all technical data was released for all new helmets (data like weight). Neither is it known which if these models will receive DOT/Snell approval.

Airoh ST 701

Airoh ST 701

Airoh presented at the Intermot motorcycle exhibition in Germany, their latest helmet the ST 701. The ST 701 is an integral, full face, helmet with some interesting features.

Airoh-ST-701

First of all, in the chin is an air vent that can be opened. So far, nothing new. But in this case, the air vent can be opened at 2 different levels; totally open, allowing for air to circulate throughout the helmet, and half open, that makes the air circulate only into the visor through special vents. This way you can blow away any fog during those cold days when you don’t want too much cold air on your head.

Airoh-ST-701

The same applies to the rear air vent, that has several positions for the air extraction.

Airoh-ST-701

The ST 701 has the Airoh quick & safe release system in case of an accident. If you have crashed, paramedics need to take care removing a helmet since the removable movements can cause permanent damage to your neck. Remember that a helmet should be fitted tight. So you can imagine removing a helmet from someone’s head can be a struggle.

The quick release system involves pulling the red tab, that releases the cheek padding. With the cheek padding gone, you can simply pull out the helmet since there is no more pressure to the head or neck.

Airoh-ST-701

Several color exist already for this helmet. However, the helmet is brand new and has not received DOT homologation, and has only just passed CE certification.

Airoh are working on bring it to the North American market.

Intermot-LogoWorld’s second largest motorcycle exhibition (the largest being the Italian EICMA), Cologne’s (Germany) Intermot, is going to open its doors at the end of the month. Held every two years, the last Intermot exhibition saw 203,000 visitors from all over the world, and 1,022 exhibitors from 37 countries.

Motorcycle exhibitors from all over the world will be showing off their wares, and a lot of new products will be shown for the first time to an overflowing crowd.

Intermot exhibition center

Intermot exhibition center

Of course there will be a plethora of new motorcycles; Ducati will be showing off their new Scrambler, Honda will have one or two new motorcycles and at least one new powerful scooter and both Suzuki and Yamaha are expected to be launching some new bikes at the popular show. Since this is the home turf of BMW, we expect to see at least one new or major revised motorcycle and/or scooter.

The only two USA based motorcycle manufactures who have a press conference to introduce new stuff are Harley-Davidson and Zero Electric.

Many of the manufactures are vying for sales in Asia, particularly India and Pakistan which is a very growing market for them. So expect quite a lot of low displacement models in the 100 to 200 cc range. Suzuki already mentioned a 150cc Gixxer, Yamaha have been making sub-200 cc bikes and then of course Honda who have lost their partnership with Hero and now attempting to take over the market on their own.

Intermot's main Boulevard with all halls on the side

Intermot’s main Boulevard with all halls on the side

But it’s not only new motorcycles that will be shown. Many manufacturers will be showing new helmets, clothing and security gear such as communicating locks (locks that communicate with your phone, in case of a theft attempt). More and more clothing manufacturers are incorporating airbag jackets, so expect to see many more of these.

The official opening is on Wednesday October 1st, but press day (the day the new stuff is introduced) is on Monday 30 September.

So after those dates, you will find much of the new stuff over here. Plenty of photos and a firsthand look at interesting products.

This is one of those phenomena which is difficult to explain, but causes so much havoc for bikers around the world. It is based on a trick our brain plays on us, and if you listen to your brain, you will end up in a world of hurt.

It is called “Target Fixation”, something that got discovered during the second World War when bombers would fly straight into the target instead of avoiding them. The pilots would have their eyes directed on whatever they had to bomb, and would fly their airplane straight into it.

The same applies to us motorcycle riders. Wherever you are looking is where your motorcycle will go to. See a pothole in the road? That is where your motorcycle will go to.

Target Fixation

Target Fixation

It is one of the main reasons you are taught to look to the end of a curve when entering one; by looking at the furtherest point of the curve, then that is where the bike will go to. If you look just in front, i.e. your apex, your bike will end up not taking the curve. You will find that at low speeds you will need to readjust your lean angle, and at higher speeds you will become intimately acquainted with the countryside.

When riding on a straight road, if an animal jumps in front of your path, often bikers will not avoid it. That is because their brains are fixed on the target, and they end up crashing into the animal.

How to avoid this?

There is no simple way of avoiding target fixation. You need to train your brain to think otherwise. The only way is not to look at the “target”. If you see that pothole in the road and you are heading straight for it, then look elsewhere. Anywhere but the pothole, and then let your reactions kick in.

Get used to the fooling your brain when riding. Look for something small on the road, like leaves or a small discoloring of the road, then look for a path away from the object and follow that path. Keep doing this until your brain starts doing it automatically.

And always remember; you go where you are looking!

(inspired by Nelson’s BMW airhead motorcycles article)

Reading Your Motorcycle Tire

Many of you will have noticed a bunch of numbers and letters printed alongside your motorcycle’s tires. Most of you don’t really care what they mean, even if they mean anything since you’ll suppose that the motorcycle manufacturer knew what he was doing when the tires were installed.

But if you ever need to change the tires and can’t find the exact same ones, it’s good to know what they mean. Especially since those numbers and letters will impact your safety while riding. Why? Because they indicate among other what the maximum speed of the tire is allowed to be. So maybe your motorcycle can ride at 200 mph, if your tire is rated for 100 mph, you are in trouble. The same applies for carrying a pillion, cargo and even towing a trailer.

determining-tire-size

The tire number is represented in one of three different ways, depending on where the tire is made and sold.

Metric:

It looks like this: 180/55ZR-17 M/C: Tire width, “/”, Aspect ratio, Speed Rating”, Tire Construction, “-” Rim diameter, Motorcycle Tire.

Inch:

5.00H-16 APR: Width, Speed Rating, Rim Diameter, Casing Strength

Alphabetical:

MT90S-16 : Motorcycle Tire, Width code, Aspect Ratio, Speed Rating, Rim Diameter,

Tire Width

The figure is expressed in millimeters or inches and represents the width from the outer wall to outer wall of the tire.

Aspect Ratio

This means the tire’s cross-sectional profile a represents the percentage of the height to width ratio. 90 for example means 90%

Speed rating

The speed the tires are rated at is indicated with a letter:

F – 50 mph

H – 130 mph

J – 62 mph

K – 68 mph

L – 75 mph

M – 81 mph

N – 87 mph

P – 93 mph

Q – 99 mph

R – 106 mph

S – 112 mph

T – 118 mph

U – 124 mph

V – 149 mph

W – 168 mph

Y – 186 mph

Z – 149+ mph

As you can see, the numbers and letters are not exactly sequential, but that is because of historical reasons. Letter type Z is old, and shows that the tire is capable of above 149 mph, which is also the case of W and Y types. There are also some letters missing in the lineup.

WARNING: Do check the tire manufacturer’s rating, since some differ.

Tire Construction

The letter indicates the whether the tire is Belted (code B) or Radial (code R).

Rim Diameter

As the word says, it’s the diameter of the wheels rim on which the tire is mounted, expressed in millimeters or inches.

Tire Load Index

The tire numbers also indicate how much weight they can carry. This is important when carrying pillion and cargo. Too much weight will deflate or worse, burst your tire.

The Load Index (L.I.) is a bit long to display here, but best is to go to the tire manufacturer’s web site and find out what the maximum load is for your tires. Believe me, it’s important especially if you have changed brand.

Here are some of the tire manufacturer’s website and their ratings:

Avon Tyres

Bridgestone

Full Bore USA

Kenda

Dunlop

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