Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Motorcycle safety’ Category

This is one of those phenomena which is difficult to explain, but causes so much havoc for bikers around the world. It is based on a trick our brain plays on us, and if you listen to your brain, you will end up in a world of hurt.

It is called “Target Fixation”, something that got discovered during the second World War when bombers would fly straight into the target instead of avoiding them. The pilots would have their eyes directed on whatever they had to bomb, and would fly their airplane straight into it.

The same applies to us motorcycle riders. Wherever you are looking is where your motorcycle will go to. See a pothole in the road? That is where your motorcycle will go to.

Target Fixation

Target Fixation

It is one of the main reasons you are taught to look to the end of a curve when entering one; by looking at the furtherest point of the curve, then that is where the bike will go to. If you look just in front, i.e. your apex, your bike will end up not taking the curve. You will find that at low speeds you will need to readjust your lean angle, and at higher speeds you will become intimately acquainted with the countryside.

When riding on a straight road, if an animal jumps in front of your path, often bikers will not avoid it. That is because their brains are fixed on the target, and they end up crashing into the animal.

How to avoid this?

There is no simple way of avoiding target fixation. You need to train your brain to think otherwise. The only way is not to look at the “target”. If you see that pothole in the road and you are heading straight for it, then look elsewhere. Anywhere but the pothole, and then let your reactions kick in.

Get used to the fooling your brain when riding. Look for something small on the road, like leaves or a small discoloring of the road, then look for a path away from the object and follow that path. Keep doing this until your brain starts doing it automatically.

And always remember; you go where you are looking!

(inspired by Nelson’s BMW airhead motorcycles article)

Read Full Post »

Many of you will have noticed a bunch of numbers and letters printed alongside your motorcycle’s tires. Most of you don’t really care what they mean, even if they mean anything since you’ll suppose that the motorcycle manufacturer knew what he was doing when the tires were installed.

But if you ever need to change the tires and can’t find the exact same ones, it’s good to know what they mean. Especially since those numbers and letters will impact your safety while riding. Why? Because they indicate among other what the maximum speed of the tire is allowed to be. So maybe your motorcycle can ride at 200 mph, if your tire is rated for 100 mph, you are in trouble. The same applies for carrying a pillion, cargo and even towing a trailer.

determining-tire-size

The tire number is represented in one of three different ways, depending on where the tire is made and sold.

Metric:

It looks like this: 180/55ZR-17 M/C: Tire width, “/”, Aspect ratio, Speed Rating”, Tire Construction, “-” Rim diameter, Motorcycle Tire.

Inch:

5.00H-16 APR: Width, Speed Rating, Rim Diameter, Casing Strength

Alphabetical:

MT90S-16 : Motorcycle Tire, Width code, Aspect Ratio, Speed Rating, Rim Diameter,

Tire Width

The figure is expressed in millimeters or inches and represents the width from the outer wall to outer wall of the tire.

Aspect Ratio

This means the tire’s cross-sectional profile a represents the percentage of the height to width ratio. 90 for example means 90%

Speed rating

The speed the tires are rated at is indicated with a letter:

F – 50 mph

H – 130 mph

J – 62 mph

K – 68 mph

L – 75 mph

M – 81 mph

N – 87 mph

P – 93 mph

Q – 99 mph

R – 106 mph

S – 112 mph

T – 118 mph

U – 124 mph

V – 149 mph

W – 168 mph

Y – 186 mph

Z – 149+ mph

As you can see, the numbers and letters are not exactly sequential, but that is because of historical reasons. Letter type Z is old, and shows that the tire is capable of above 149 mph, which is also the case of W and Y types. There are also some letters missing in the lineup.

WARNING: Do check the tire manufacturer’s rating, since some differ.

Tire Construction

The letter indicates the whether the tire is Belted (code B) or Radial (code R).

Rim Diameter

As the word says, it’s the diameter of the wheels rim on which the tire is mounted, expressed in millimeters or inches.

Tire Load Index

The tire numbers also indicate how much weight they can carry. This is important when carrying pillion and cargo. Too much weight will deflate or worse, burst your tire.

The Load Index (L.I.) is a bit long to display here, but best is to go to the tire manufacturer’s web site and find out what the maximum load is for your tires. Believe me, it’s important especially if you have changed brand.

Here are some of the tire manufacturer’s website and their ratings:

Avon Tyres

Bridgestone

Full Bore USA

Kenda

Dunlop

Read Full Post »

It often makes me laugh, or maybe it is cry. People go out and buy an expensive motorcycle, fit it out with lots of expensive accessories, and then buy expensive matching clothing, helmets, boots and other fine items. Then when they need to top up the oil, they buy the cheapest oil they can find.

It is a bit like a NASA rocket launch failing because of a 10 cent component. Oil is what makes your motorcycle run smoothly, and putting in oil that is not meant for your bike is making sure that you will have a problem later on.

Motor_oil

Just think about it. Every motorcycle model is different. Different in engine size, cylinder compression, cooling and a same motorcycle that lives in the desert is going to be different from one that live up up North in Canada.

Every aspect dictates what kind of oil you need to use. Your owner manual will tell you what kind of viscosity you need to use, but they will tell you a range. The viscosity will be determined as mentioned above on the displacement, the cylinder-head compression, horsepower, the kind of cooling used and most importantly, at what kind of revs your bike’s engine will run (you can understand that a motorcycle that runs at 12,000 rpm will need different oil than one that runs at 3,000 rpm).

The only thing you need to take into account, is the outside temperature and if your bike remains inactive for long periods of time. The viscosity grades are ranged from 0 to 60 (with 0 being the lowest viscosity). If you find the letter “W” after the grade, this implies that the oil can be used during the winter.

The other choice you can make, but you will need to read your owner’s manual attentively, is whether you use regular/mineral based oil, or synthetic. This can depend on the engine and the manufacturer, but often they will leave the choice up to you.

But whatever you select, select wisely. The last thing you will want is having your expensive motorcycle engine seize up while riding the freeway at 70 mph.

Read Full Post »

Stolen-Motorcycle-Just-Chain-leftBarring accidents, there is nothing worse than having your motorcycle stolen. Arriving at your bike hoping to ride away and finding an empty space is a very emotional moment – a moment of despair.

Professional thieves will take your bike no matter what, you can slow them down and more important, prevent it from being stolen by amateurs.

First, let’s look at this video to see how quickly a professional will steal your bike:

You see how quick that went? The bike had two locks…

Now let’s see what you can do about Sunday-thieves or opportunists.

  1. Garage: Get a covered garage. It’s more complicated to steal from a garage than from the street. You can even buy bike shelters that you can put in your garden if you don’t have a garage.
  2. Ignition Lock: The easy one. Make sure your ignition is in the “Lock” position. It’ll not do much, but it slows thieves down.
  3. Chains/Locks: Use big and heavy chains, or approved and very strong locks. You can see from the video that a professional will cut through chains/locks like you would cut through butter with a knife. But a big chain anchored to a heavy object will prevent thieves from grabbing your bike and placing it in a truck.Placing a chain from your rear wheel to a fixed position is the best you can do. Front wheels are more easily removed.
  4. Alarm: An alarm is a good thing, especially if it’s very loud. Once someone moves your bike, the alarm goes off. No thief wants to be seen next to a very loud siren. You can get really fancy alarms that will send you a text message once your bike is being stolen, allowing you the time to contact the police to file your report.
  5. Tracking: A tracking device hidden in the bike will not prevent it from being stolen, but might make its recovery faster and easier.
  6. Cover: Cover your bike. Often professional thieves look for motorcycles “on demand”, meaning they will have been asked to steal a specific brand. Covering your bike will make it more difficult to spot.

So there you are. Remember, you can’t prevent a season and professional thief from stealing your bike, but you can make it more difficult. And another good thing to do, get a good insurance.

Read Full Post »

In the last article we explained about track days and all the preparations to go to one. It’s your chance to find out how fast you really are without running into cars, stoplights and even cops.

Now let’s look at some tips on the actually racing. Most of this you will hear from the circuit professionals, something you will really, really, need to go for. Ask them, since they will show you all the ropes, more than I can ever tell you. Track day training is going to be essential.

But for the mean time, here are a few points.

  1. Before going out, make sure you know what each flag stands for. Know when the track marshals are telling you that there is oil on the track, when the session has been called off, when to stop, etc etc. It’s very important to know all the flags, since it can save your life.Trackday-flags
  2. Have fun out there. You don’t have a career in racing, so have fun. You are not there to race everyone on the circuit. Eventually you will find some other racers whom you can measure yourself against, but don’t try it in the first few sessions.
  3. First few laps, ride behind an experienced racer. They will know when and where to brake, and enter into the corners. This way you get a “feel” for the circuit, and you slowly memorize the layout.
  4. Never, ever, look just in front of your tires. Always look as far ahead as your can, especially in a curve. If you look down in front of you, that is where your bike will go. So look towards the exit of the curve, unless of course you want to inspect the grass and gravel.
  5. When hitting the brakes, remember that most of the work will be done by the front brakes. It’s an 80/20 rule – 80% front and 20% the rest (remember your body can also slow down your bike, so not only your rear is in the 20%).
  6. If you do run off the track, do not use your front brakes. When you are still at speed, keep straight and slowly use your rear brakes to slow down. If you are still going too fast and heading for the crash barriers, get off your bike. You will stop faster than your bike.
  7. If you do go back to the pits, make sure the other riders know this, or even when you are slowing down. Race your arm, signaling that you are slowing down. This will prevent another riders from slamming into you.
  8. Don’t over do it. Know you limits, and slowly start improving them. Just because Nicky Hayden was riding in front of you and managed to take that curve at 150 mph, doesn’t mean you can. Do not ride outside your limits. It’s going to take time and practice.
  9. Slowly start lowering your body alongside the bike in the corners. Don’t worry if you can’t put your knee down yet. It takes time and practice to be comfortable doing this. Move your center of gravity (CoG) more and more to the inside of the curve.
  10. When going out on the first laps, take it slow to warm up the tires. Be safe and take two laps making sure the tires have reached perfect temperature, but when you do, keep looking behind you since other racers will already be in their fast laps, and you don’t want to “mingle” with them.
  11. Relax! Racing is about being relaxed. If you stiffen up, you will not be racing smoothly, and therefore you will not be racing at all. More likely, you will be crashing a lot. Just relax, breath going into the corners through the nose, breath out when exiting through the mouth. This way you get a good rhythm going, and you will not fog up your visor.
  12. Oh, and if you think you’ll look cool doing that winner’s wheelie, think again. You’ll find that the circuit will ask you to leave.
  13. When you are part of a novice group, and the seasoned riders are on the track, go and look how they are doing it and learn from them. Talk to them when not riding, and ask for advice. You’ll find that most of them will help you if they can.

Trackday-3

So now you are ready to go and play on the tracks. Remember, it’s for fun. You will learn a lot, and gain more skills in riding your motorcycle in day-to-day traffic in the city. And you will finally find out in a safe way how fast you really are. And that is what it’s all about.

Have fun.

Read Full Post »

Once you have got your motorcycle, you will want to find out how quick it, and you, is. If you have a sportsbike, chances are it’s very fast, and trying it on the streets is not the way to find out. You will probably find out what the inside of a hospital or morgue looks like before finding out how fast you are. The smart thing to do is race your motorcycle on a circuit. And for that, you don’t need to be a Nicky Hayden: anyone can try their skills on a race circuit. Most circuits have track days, days that the race tracks are open to the general public. Click here for a list of many track day organizers.

Find a race track close to you and call them, or check their web site. Track days are usually during the week, since weekends are for races. It’s not going to be cheap, count about $100 per day and that is just for the privilege of riding on the track.

Trackday-1

Instruction

Most circuits will have professional racers available to show you the ropes. They will take you around the track to show you where you need to watch out, when to hit the brakes, where to take your curve etc. It’s a bit like tennis courts of golf links; it’s the circuit pro who knows the track inside out. Pay attention, any advice they give is going to be important, no matter how small the details.

So don’t worry if you have never done it before. Newbies are just as welcome as seasoned track day racers. And if the pro is not available, ask the other users. A good friendship is always to be found on the circuits, people are usually eager to help each other.

When registering for track day, go for the new rider slots & training. Almost every circuit has them, and for your first few times, you will need it. Do not be ashamed to do it, everyone has done it.

Which Motorcycles?

There is no hard and fast rule. Any bike will do, but obviously you are going to be looking a bit silly racing a cruiser. Street bikes and sportsbikes will be the ones seen the most on track days.

Trackday-2b

ATGATT

If there is one rule that should be golden it’s the ATGATT rule. All The Gear, All The Time. Most circuits will not even allow you to race without proper gear. No skimping, your life is going to depend on it.

Get a full face integral helmet. Not even a flip up helmet will do here, it needs to be one piece. And the lighter it is, the more you will enjoy it since your head is going to be pulled by the G-forces.

You will need race gloves. If you do go off the bike, chances are that your speed is going to be very fast, and when sliding, those gloves will need to withstand a long slide. Unless of course you don’t mind some skin grafts.

Best is leather pants and jackets, preferably racing ones, but they are very expensive. Best are of course the one-piece racing suits. Expensive, but worth it. But whatever your have, you will need to have either leather or synthetic anti-abrasion material. Do not go out in jeans.

A spine protector really is a must. You’ve probably seen images of professional racers tumbling across the sand and gravel after a shunt. Now imagine this is you, and what your spine is going to go through!

And finally, get some race boots. They need to fit properly, since if you do go off, you don’t want to see your foot without boots sliding 150 mph over the track, do you?

Check Your Motorcycle

You are going to need to make sure your motorcycle is in racing condition. No, I don’t mean that you have sponsor decals on your bike, and umbrella girls. Tires and brake pads should be new, not worn down. The tires should really be racing tires since they stick better to the surface. But race tires wear down quickly, so be prepared to buy a few.

Remove your mirrors and if possible your indicators. If not the track will do that for you when you drop your bike the first time, but it’s not going to be neat.

Tape up your remaining lights, since if your bike goes down, chances are their is going to be debris on the track.

Your suspension should be set up properly for racing. Usually the firmer, the better. Read the manual for the best settings.

Make sure your bike has had a full maintenance done recently, and that fuel, water, coolants, fluids etc are all topped up.

Trackday-2

Going There

If you have done all of the above, best is to transport your motorcycle on a trailer. Not only does it save time once you are at the circuit, but also in case you wreck your bike, you at least have some form of transportation to get back home.

Alternatively, ask if the circuit rents sportsbikes. Some do, and this way you can wreck someone else’s motorcycle.

Check the sleeping conditions at the track in case you are a bit far away. Many circuits offer sleeping areas, but don’t expect comfort – more likely that they’ll be bunk beds.

Eat & Drink Smart

Obviously the last thing you want to do the night before your track day is go on a drinking (and even eating) bender. Avoid alcohol since you are going to be sweating a lot during the day, even if it’s cold. Make sure you hydrate continuously, so bring plenty of water.

Have a good breakfast since you energy is going to be zapped. It’s like going into combat; your adrenaline is going to be pumping through your veins, so make sure you have proteins and fluid in your tummy and more to top it up during the day. Soldiers don’t fight well on an empty stomach, and neither do racers.

Paperwork

You will be needing to sign all sorts of waiver forms with the circuit, but that’s normal. Do check with your insurance company what they will cover on track days. You’ll be surprised that insurance companies accept track days, since at the end, it improves your riding skills.

In our next episode, we will tell you more about the physical aspects of racing your motorcycle during track days. The “how to race” part.

Read Full Post »

Motorcycles do break down at times, though much less nowadays then in the past. Bikes are more dependable, but it does happen that one suddenly stops working. If you are riding on a road, even a highway, tollroad or freeway, you will be able to pull over. Head of the emergency lane or to the side of the road, and do whatever you need to do to get your bike going again (remember the times that you had to switch a fuel selector for normal or reserve??).

Tunnel-riding-0

But if your motorcycle stops working inside a tunnel, then it is a whole different matter, especially in a narrow tunnel with only two single traffic lanes. Then it can become a nightmare.

Here are some simple tips to help minimize troubles:

Tunnel-riding-1

  1. The moment you find out your bike is acting up, put on your hazard warning.
  2. Make sure your lights are on (unless of course you are having electrical problems).
  3. Start slowing down before the bike slows you down. This will slow traffic down behind you in a more controlled way.
  4. Pull alongside the right side of the road as far to the right as you can, even if there is an emergency lane.
  5. Keep your light on the bike on.
  6. Make sure YOU are visible (clothing, lights, etc).
  7. If there are emergency call boxes (telephones) inside the tunnel, best is to park your bike several yards further.
  8. If there is no phone in the tunnel, walk against the traffic direction, alongside the wall to the outside (unless of course you are very close to the other side of the tunnel). Remember that it’s dark, and you will be difficult to be seen.
  9. If you are indeed in a narrow tunnel with no emergency lane, DO NOT ATTEMPT to fix the problem yourself, but get the hell out of Dodge City.
  10. Contact authorities or a garage to get your bike out of there.

Tunnel-riding-2

If you think it’ll never happen to you, think again. Every year quite a few bikes break down in a tunnel, and a few result in accidents.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 225 other followers